October 7, 2016
Friday Faves: Oct. 7

Connect to links we love, programs we admire, events to look forward to, folks to follow and great work in the public humanities.

The first week of October has been filled with interesting humanities finds. Check out a few favorites below.

Kristen Fuhs Wells, director of communications and development:

  • New York has e-short stories for its trains, now France has printed short stories, dispensed at train stations while you wait. Either way, I love the ways we’re getting creative to bring literature to people, even in small doses.
  • Actress Emma Thompson spent a week in the arctic and this is what she learned: It’s not just about the ice, it’s about the people. Read her short diary-like entries about the wisdom she learned from the Inuit elders, how much a coke costs and her chores on the ship in this lovely sneak peek into life in the arctic.

Bronwen Fetters, executive assistant and program associate:

Leah Nahmias, director of programs:

  • Archaeological mystery: how did Roman coins end up in a 12th century Japanese dig site? Let’s imagine the backstory that brought these artifacts such a long journey through time and space.
  • NPR’s been running a series called “Unsung Museums” about little-known, often quirky collections in out of the way places. J’adore!
  • Do you know the history of Esperanto? I first learned about it in a college class at IU called Jews and Cosmopolitanism—and recently reencountered it in an essay from the LA Review of Books. The idealistic inventor of the language, Polish Jew Ludwig Zamenhof, hoped to create a universal language to counter the raging nationalisms of his time, envisioning a time when all humans could easily communicate with each other and misunderstandings—and war—would end. It’s interesting to trace the origins of the Esperanto movement to the particular historical circumstances that led to its creation.

George Hanlin, director of grants:

  • This week I had the honor of visiting IU South Bend’s Civil Rights Heritage Center to attend a lecture that Indiana Humanities helped to fund with one of our grants. The Civil Rights Heritage Center is housed in the former Engman Public Natatorium, which banned African Americans from the time it opened in 1922 until 1936 (and which wasn’t fully integrated until 1950). The center’s website tells the story of the natatorium, with a video describing the heroic efforts that South Bend’s African American community undertook to bring about change.
  • At the other end of the state, the residents of Lyles Station are celebrating their community’s prominent placement in the new National Museum of African American History and Culture. The Washington Post tells the touching story of how a group of them headed to Washington to take part in the museum’s ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Jacqueline Cromleigh, communications and community relations manager:

  • The revival of “Gilmore Girls” has had many in my generation excited about the return of our favorite fast-talking duo. In honor of the show’s upcoming return to Netflix, I had to share a list of all 339 books referenced in the series. Rory’s bookish tendencies were always such a delightful part of the show!
  • As a lover of Instagram, I found this overview of the company’s new offices quite enjoyable. Take a look at the new digs, complete with 3-D versions of the app perfect for snapping that next shot.

Keira Amstutz, president and CEO:

Do you have any humanities highlights from your week? We would love to hear from you in the comment section below.

Photo via Getty Images
Photo via Getty Images
Photo via BBC.com
Photo via BBC.com
Photo via NPR
Photo via NPR
Photo via Buzzfeed
Photo via Buzzfeed
Photo via The Guardian
Photo via The Guardian
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