September 2, 2016
Friday Faves: Sept. 2

Connect to links we love, programs we admire, events to look forward to, folks to follow and great work in the public humanities.

We’re talking ice cream, interactive reading services, Soviet canine cosmonauts and Hamilton in this week’s Friday Faves.

Bronwen Fetters, executive assistant and program associate:

  • This is so cool… Now that they’ve worked to provide Wi-Fi service in 175 of their underground stations, the New York Subway system is offering a new web platform in partnership with Penguin Random House. Subway Reads offers a variety of e-book reading selections based on the length of subway riders’ commutes: 10-page selections for 10-minute rides, 30-pages for 30-minutes, etc. The short stories and excerpts come from contemporary authors like Lee Child and Alexander McCall Smith to classic writers like Fitzgerald and Poe. And the best part? It’s free!
  • I loved reading about what the Roald Dahl estate in London is doing to celebrate the centennial of the author’s birth. The team, spearheaded by his own grandson Luke Kelly, has the goal that every child in the world will engage with one of Dahl’s beloved stories. Other efforts have included television/film projects, live shows, interactive exhibits, apps, a line of children’s clothing, Dahl-inspired classical music compositions, and even giving away extracted Dahl books with McDonald’s Happy Meals!

Kristen Fuhs Wells, director of communications and development:

  • I love this great twist on delivering and interacting with readers. Amy Krouse Rosenthal’s new interactive “Textbook” encourages readers to send text messages as they read the book. (Get it? TEXT BOOK.)
  • What’s the “gateway” rock song for kids? For many, it’s The Beatles’ Yellow Submarine (my son included). Here’s a look at the genesis of that song and how it (and The Beatles) have instilled a love of music for many from a young age.

Leah Nahmias, director of programs and community engagement:

  • Indiana Poet Laureate Shari Wagner wrote a beautiful recap of our recent Next Indiana Campfire trek at Prophetstown State Park, “Lost Things Still Rising Here.” Read it and get thee to one of our upcoming fall events!
  • Geology shapes culture, as we southern Indiana natives know well. I was incredibly moved by this essay by a geologist based in Italy, reflecting on the collapse of epochs that accompanied the August 24 earthquake in the Italian Appennines. Here’s one image that will stick with me: “At daybreak, we heard that aggressive wild boars, disoriented by the tremors, had fled the forests and were running through the nearby fields and villages. Local boar hunters—cacciatori di cinghiali—were out shooting them or flushing them back into the woods. The strange threat of the boars heightened the sense that the placid present had intersected with an ancient, feral past.”
  • You need an infographic about Soviet canine cosmonauts in your life! It’s one of a daily series of science-themed infographics created by the website Futurism.

Keira Amstutz, president and CEO:

Jacqueline Cromleigh, communications and community relations manager:

George Hanlin, director of grants:

  • If you’ve been loving Indiana Humanities’ Next Indiana Campfires treks this summer (with their combination of nature and literature), you’ll no doubt enjoy a website called “Our Land, Our Literature.” Produced by Ball State students, it explores Indiana’s ecosystem and Hoosier authors who have written about the environment.
  • Are you a fan of Hamilton the musical? Do you want to learn more about the stories behind the songs? If so, visit the official website of the music from the show. You can stream the soundtrack and read annotated lyrics that explain things and tell you all the history you’ve forgotten (or probably never learned).

Do you have any humanities highlights from your week? We would love to hear from you in the comment section below.

Photo via The New York Times
Photo via The New York Times
Photo via The Observer
Photo via The Observer
Photo via Futurism.com
Photo via Futurism.com
Photo via The Smithsonian
Photo via The Smithsonian
Photo via Atlantic Records
Photo via Atlantic Records
Posted In: Miscellaneous

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