October 28, 2016
Friday Faves: Oct. 28

Connect to links we love, programs we admire, events to look forward to, folks to follow and great work in the public humanities.

What are your humanities highlights from the week? Read our team’s favorite finds below!

Jacqueline Cromleigh, communications and community relations manager:

  • “Your phone has just become home to a tiny little collection of modern art.” The first generation of the emoji you often text is now on display at MoMA. This New York Times article explains how the museum acquired the original collection of 176 emojis, adding to its expanding digital collection. These little icons have come a long way in design!
  • The World Series chatter (and banter) is alive and well here in our office. Here’s a look back at 20 years of monumental moments in post-season baseball history.

Leah Nahmias, director of programs:

  • I came across an essay on The Stone this week that asks the provocative question, “Is Humanity Getting Better?” Given the “history of epidemics” hook, no wonder I loved it. But it’s this idea I’ve been mulling over: “The 20th century marked an inflection point — the beginning of humanity’s transition from its ancient crises of ignorance to its modern crises of invention.”
  • I’m excited to start listening to Sidedoor, a new podcast that from the Smithsonian that tells “stories about science, art, history, humanity and where they unexpectedly overlap.”
  • In honor of the World Series—and no, I won’t pick sides, both teams are incredibly likeable—I’m throwing it back to one of my favorite college classes, History of Baseball. Two books that have stuck with me over the years: Roger Kahn’s elegiac The Boys of Summer and Howard Bryant’s fierce, urgent Shut Out: A Story of Race and Baseball in Boston.

George Hanlin, director of grants:

  • After three days of jury duty this week, I’m having trouble getting legal matters out of my mind. So I searched the internet and found this list of the 12 best jury-themed films and TV shows. If you’re in the mood for little courtroom drama (without as much real-life murder and mayhem as I had), these are judicious choices.
  • In an age when it seems the strongest connections people have with one another are often via computers and cell phones, it’s nice to receive a reminder that physical places still matter to the heart and soul. Hoosiers got that message this week with news from Indiana Landmarks, which recently spearheaded a fundraising campaign to restore the beloved old L.S. Ayres and Company clock in downtown Indianapolis. Landmarks’ initial effort to raise $20,000 was quickly met, so it tripled the goal based on further repair assessments. The new $60,000 benchmark was surpassed two weeks before the campaign’s official close. The icon that has watched over the Crossroads of America for 80 years gains new life thanks to the memories it has inspired, and a new generation gets to mark time’s passing not just with their smart phones but also with the help of a community treasure that binds us together.

Bronwen Fetters, executive assistant and program associate:

Kristen Fuhs Wells, director of communications and development:

  • As the World Series moves to Wrigley Field this weekend, millions of people will notice the ivy-adorned outfield wall. But, were it not for a stadium in Indianapolis, that iconic ivy likely wouldn’t even be there.
  • In this piece for Time, author James Patterson urges people to put down their smart phones and pick a book, as he laments the loss of long-form literature, and how that in turn impacts society.

Keira Amstutz, president and CEO:

Want to share a few of your favorite links? We would love to hear from you in the comment section below.

Photo via New York Times
Photo via New York Times
Photo via New York Times
Photo via New York Times
Photo via Radio Times
Photo via Radio Times
Photo via Indiana Landmarks
Photo via Indiana Landmarks
Photo via TIME
Photo via TIME
Posted In: Miscellaneous

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