January 6, 2017
Friday Faves: Jan. 6

Connect to links we love, programs we admire, events to look forward to, folks to follow and great work in the public humanities.

We’re kicking off the start of 2017 with our favorite finds of the week. Have a few conversation starters you want to share? We would love to hear from you in the comment section below.

Leah Nahmias, director of programs:

Jacqueline Cromleigh, communications and community relations manager:

  • This foil scratch-off chart is a classic reader’s dream. The poster allows you to brag about the books you read in golden fashion. I’m thinking we might need one for the Indiana Humanities office!
  • BookRiot has compiled a list of the best reading challenges on the web to help you read more in 2017! I might add the Russian Literature Reading Challenge to my list of resolutions.

Bronwen Fetters, executive assistant and program associate:

  • Looking to learn more in the new year? One of my recent internet favorites is the Crash Course channel on YouTube. Created by popular internet brothers Hank and John Green and produced by PBS, the channel features video courses with short mini-episodes on a variety of subjects. So if you didn’t give your freshman gen ed classes the attention they deserved, you can refresh your knowledge of the Roman Empire or Oedipus Rex in about 12 minutes!
  • Here’s a BuzzFeed list of 19 Books to Read Before They Hit Theaters in 2017. While I don’t necessarily endorse all of the selections (i.e. Captain Underpants and Fifty Shades Darker), there are certainly some titles worth reading. You can even take advantage of our free Novel Conversations lending library to prepare for the new movies, since our library has The Zookeeper’s WifeThe Circle and Murder on the Orient Express.

George Hanlin, director of grants:

  • Last year Indiana Humanities awarded grants to a couple of museums that are working to make their tours more accessible to visitors with disabilities: The Rotary Jail Museum in Crawfordsville will provide text and videos on tablet devices for people who can’t go to the second floor, and the Indiana Medical History Museum will create an app for visitors who are hearing impaired. I’m excited about these innovative efforts and hope that this work will serve as a model for others. If you’re interested in learning more about how you can make your museum, library or cultural organization more accessible, I encourage you to attend a “Museum Accessibility Workshop” sponsored by the Rotary Jail Museum next Saturday, January 14. Kris Johnson from Access Indy will deliver the workshop from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Tannenbaum Cultural Center, 107 W. Spring St. in Crawfordsville. Admission is free but registration is required; RSVP by Monday, January 9, to Matt Salzman at 765.362.5222 or contactus@rotaryjailmuseum.org.
  • While we’re on the topic of making museums more accessible, I’ll point out this story that appeared this week on NPR’s website. It highlights the Smithsonian Institution’s efforts to help visually impaired visitors enjoy the beauty on display at the American Art Museum in our nation’s capital.
  • Finally, as we settle into 2017, here’s a heartwarming piece about one family’s decades-long efforts to celebrate the new year—and how they’ve adapted and maintained the tradition across time and distance.
Photo via Guardian
Photo via Guardian
Photo via Fast Company
Photo via Fast Company
Photo via Buzzfeed
Photo via Buzzfeed
Photo via NY Times
Photo via NY Times
Posted In: Miscellaneous

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